Kathryn Blackmore Borel

I have been embroidering ever since I can remember, at least since I was 6 years old. My maternal grandmother, Winifred, was an accomplished needlewoman and since I was the only girl in the family, I was her pupil and a happy one. Although a much valued skill in the 50's and early 60's, this part of a girl's education would be ultimately replaced by other skills, less gender oriented.

But embroidery remained as a part of my day, my respite from the busy and aggressive world, my way of expressing my artistic voice. I loved the colour, the textures, the smells of the haberdashery stores, the fabric markets. This love persisted through my adolescence to adulthood, from Europe to North America, twice over, and continues to be a constant . It remains my principal medium of artistic expression whereby universal forms are transformed by the needle, fine, vibrant, colourful natural fibres and a time worn repertoire of embroidery techniques, each of which bringing its unique textural element and luminescence to create a contemporary piece.

Photo: David Stevenson, Davision, Toronto

Kathryn Blackmore Borel

I have been embroidering ever since I can remember, at least since I was 6 years old. My maternal grandmother, Winifred, was an accomplished needlewoman and since I was the only girl in the family, I was her pupil and a happy one. Although a much valued skill in the 50's and early 60's, this part of a girl's education would be ultimately replaced by other skills, less gender oriented.

But embroidery remained as a part of my day, my respite from the busy and aggressive world, my way of expressing my artistic voice. I loved the colour, the textures, the smells of the haberdashery stores, the fabric markets. This love persisted through my adolescence to adulthood, from Europe to North America, twice over, and continues to be a constant . It remains my principal medium of artistic expression whereby universal forms are transformed by the needle, fine, vibrant, colourful natural fibres and a time worn repertoire of embroidery techniques, each of which bringing its unique textural element and luminescence to create a contemporary piece.

Photo: David Stevenson, Davision, Toronto